Location, Location, Location #24

Location No 24 – From Somerset West to the West Coast of South Africa

Welcome to the latest stop on our literary tour through the pages of my novels. This week we’ll taking a pleasant drive from my home town to the little fictional town on the West Coast of South Africa to meet the characters from Song of the Sea Goddess who were so much fun to write about. The ladies are loosely based on some of the people whom I met when I arrived in Somerset West, not so long ago as the postcard above might suggest, I hasten to add.

The reason I’m showing you the postcard is that it gives you an idea of the style of house in which my two little aunties live, although their cottage stands alone on a dusty road just a stone-throw from the sea. Several similar ‘Cape Dutch’ style houses still remain in Somerset West, the best examples being in Church Street, which has an interesting history and which is a place that became an important part of my life when I arrived here.

Auntie Grace and Auntie Rose provide a comedic element to the novel, and the group of ladies their characters are based upon had the same wry outlook on life.

We were all part of a small volunteer group which sought to provide support to clients of the public clinic who were being treated for HIV, TB and other chronic conditions. It sounds a bit grim, but we did in fact have a lot of fun, as we engaged in various uplifting activities including sewing, knitting and beadwork, all of which was accompanied by singing and chatting over cups of tea and coffee, and the plates of sandwiches which were my contribution.

Somerset West Clinic, Church Street

Most of my fellow volunteers lived in Church Street in houses which were built on a plot of land originally owned by Lady Phillips, wife of Cape Governor, Lord Charles Phillips around the turn of the 20th century. A Methodist church and a school were also established here. My involvement in the support group was as a result of a connection to that school via an international art competition and exchange programme with my husband’s school in the UK back in 2008. It was through the friends we made at Somerset West Primary School that led to us moving Somerset West, two years later.

During our two mornings a week in our room at the back of the clinic, our conversations tended to centre on matters like ‘soapies’ (soap operas), clothes, kids and cooking. Sharing recipes and talking about food was what really cemented my connection with members of the group and this is how I came upon some of ‘Auntie Rose’s recipes‘ and my character’s cooking became part of her story.

And now to the story. The following excerpt is taken from an early part of the book where Albertina, new to the little West Coast town, first comes across the aunties.

Excerpt from Song of the Sea Goddess

A commotion at the front of the little house catches Albertina’s attention. Two little old aunties are marching up and down their stoep, noisily pulling the chairs from under the table, bending over and searching the floor. They both straighten up so much as they can; one holds up her hands in the air, the other plants her hands on her broad hips and shakes her head.

She walks over and stands looking at them, her head on one side and a smile on her bright red lips.

‘Come,’ Auntie Rose beckons her onto the stoep. ‘She can help us look, can’t she, Auntie Grace?’

Auntie Grace nods and hurries over to open the little gate for Albertina. She takes hold of Albertina’s sleeve. ‘Come,’ she tugs at the sleeve, propelling Albertina towards the table. ‘Put your bag down here and help us look.’

‘She doesn’t know what we’re looking for,’ says Auntie Rose.

‘I’m coming to that.’

Auntie Rose rolls her eyes and squints up at Albertina. ‘She’s lost her glasses,’ she points to her sister, ‘and I’ve lost my teeth,’ she explains gurning at Albertina. ‘My false teeth,’ she adds, in case Albertina misunderstands.

Albertina places her bag on the table and looks from one little auntie to the other. Immediately she notices the pair of glasses perched on Grace’s head. She points to her own head. Auntie Grace reaches up with one hand, pulls her glasses off her tightly cropped grey hair and holds them out to her sister, her eyebrows raised.

It’s Auntie Rose’s turn to put her hands on her hips. ‘I wasn’t looking there,’ she said indignantly. ‘You said they must have fallen on the floor, and anyway,’ she continued, ‘that’s where I was looking for my teeth.’ Albertina bends down to look under the table. As she does so, she notices a crescent-shaped bulge halfway down Auntie Rose’s rather tightly stretched pants’ leg. She stands up and points at the bulge. Auntie Rose looks down. Her hand goes to her thigh feeling the trapped object. She starts to giggle. She sits on the nearest chair and eases the object down past her knee. Still giggling she scoops the object up as it drops out of her pants’ leg and brandishes a set of teeth aloft. Both aunties burst into peals of laughter. Such is their merriment that Albertina joins in too, her eyes darting about the stoep.

As the laughter dies down, Albertina seizes the brush which is leaning by the wall and starts to sweep the stoep. Albertina is a demon sweeper. The aunties watch as she whisks up the dust and crumbs and bits of fabric and thread which have accumulated under the table. She makes a neat pile and looks around. She grabs the little shovel that stands in the corner and deftly sweeps the pile onto it. She spies the dirt bin the other side of the wall and swiftly deposits the rubbish inside, before replacing the brush and shovel. She goes to pick up her bag, but Auntie Grace puts her hand on hers and points towards a chair. ‘Sit a moment.’

The sisters look at each other and something unspoken passes between them.

‘We could do with some help,’ says Auntie Grace. ‘We can’t pay a lot mind. There’s not so much to do but, you know, some of the heavier work…’

A smile spreads across Albertina’s face.

‘Where do you stay?’ asks Auntie Rose.

Albertina gestures vaguely at the road behind them.

The two aunties nod at each other and stand up. ‘Come and see,’ Auntie Grace says to Albertina as she heads into the house. Albertina picks up her handbag and follows her through the little kitchen to the back yard. Auntie Rose follows, her left leg swings awkwardly as she walks.

Out in the yard is a little wendy house. Auntie Grace pulls the door open. ‘It needs a good clean but would you like to…’

Albertina throws her arms around Auntie Grace, who totters, slightly off balance. Auntie Grace laughs, disentangling herself.

‘There’s a little bathroom too,’ says Auntie Rose, pointing to a small lean-to next to the kitchen. ‘It only has cold water though…’

‘Albertina only washes in cold water,’ she says proudly.

The two aunties look at each other. ‘That’s settled then,’ says Auntie Grace. ‘Why don’t you make us some tea?’ Auntie Rose beckons to Albertina and leads the way to the kitchen.


Song of the Sea Goddess 
On Amazon: USA ~ UK ~ IND ~ AUS ~ CAN ~ ESP ~ South Africa and the Rest of the World
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Image credits: Wikipedia (unknown author), Somerset West Clinic

33 thoughts on “Location, Location, Location #24

  1. I have not visited Somerset West, Chris, but your adventures sound lovely. I do know a few people who have lived their during their lives. I have this book on my kindle and just need to finish my two beta reads for writing group friends.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’ve met so many interesting and amusing people here, and have bumped into a couple of people elsewhere who’ve lived here at some point, even one in Zambia!
      Hope you enjoy the book, Robbie.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This is such a fun and creative way to introduce us more to the backstory behind your books. I’m glad that you were able to have fun despite being a part of a volunteer group that supported people with chronic conditions. I also like how the women that you were with inspired your story like how sharing recipes inspired some of Auntie Rose’s recipes. I really enjoyed reading the story excerpt – thanks for sharing! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for reading! I’m pleased you enjoyed the ‘tour’. Working with that group really brought it home to me that I’d come from a very different culture and background, and yet under the skin I shared so much with this group, especially the women. But it was through my knowledge of cookery, especially the use of eastern spices that really made the difference. I have my many happy experiences of cooking and eating with a friend of mine back in the UK, whose family originally came from Pakistan, to thank for that.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Does Main Street look today as it did when that ‘picture was took’, Chris? Sometimes streets don’t change at all, and other times they become totally unrecognisable… my Inner Historian is curious!
    And what a fun snippet to your book. I’ve just broken my glasses with my knee, funnily enough, as I’d forgotten where I’d put them. I found them once I heard the crunch as I knelt. 🤣 Not quite the same, but legs and glasses are involved so we’re kind of in the same tree. I waffle. Apologies! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • In a word, no! Sadly many of Somerset West’s beautiful old buildings have been vandalised by developers. This gives you a better idea of how the place is now: https://voertaal.nu/somerset-west-western-cape-upper-main-road/

      Oh dear about your glasses, Tom. Before I had my right eye lasered I had several spectacle-related mishaps. I once managed to get my bag caught in a revolving door and when I retrieved said spectacles they were irretrievably mangled. It was back in the days of little round John Lennon glasses. I couldn’t see a thing at the presentation I was attending!

      Now I’m waffling… 🤣

      Liked by 1 person

      • Times change and things move on, I suppose. Sometimes the old and the new work, but not all the time.
        I’m managing without me goggles, although my eyes feel tired. I have my eye test tomorrow (eek! In horrendous Covid conditions, apparently, at least I’m now double-jabbed) and then it’s another couple of weeks for my specs to be made.
        Waffling’s good, really!

        Liked by 1 person

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