Forged from Fer

‘To the forge!’

The two dwarves hurried off while Sinead struggled to her feet. With renewed resolve she tucked the Prophesy Book into her cloak, fastened her sword and followed.

She found them stoking up the fire.

‘Which metal shall we use?’ Dorrin asked.

Alric turned to her. ‘My lady, can you guide us?’

Sinead turned to the final page of the Prophesy Book, where a new verse had appeared:

‘Forged in the Depths from Finest Fer, the Key to Free our Mother
wrought-well by the Sons Of Earth, Sinead must bring, no other.’

Alric caught Sinead’s puzzled look. ‘Tis iron to us Sons of Earth, my lady.’

‘And a fitting use for this,’ said Dorrin, holding up a glowing globe of iron.

They set to work, heating and hammering, until finally they placed a beautifully-crafted key in her hand.

If only she knew where Mother Earth was being held.


Image credit: SuchanPhoto, Shutterstock

Previous episodes of Sinead’s Final Quest an epic tale, unfolding in tiny 150 word increments.

24 thoughts on “Forged from Fer

  1. Sinead wondered what metal as me. Then I saw it “wrought well,” which means iron to the sons of men.
    Its a good thing that was the right choice, since the dwarves had the metal hot and ready to be forged. lol Another good chapter Chris.

    Liked by 1 person

        • Spanish is a lovely language. It’s the only foreign language in which I have reasonable proficiency. I studied it at night school and passed my A level when I was in my forties – Grade A – I was very proud of myself! I clearly remember chatting about Pablo Neruda’s poetry in my oral exam, which was held in the Grand Masonic Hall in Liverpool. I don’t think they otherwise allow women in there!

          Liked by 1 person

            • It was surprisingly relaxed, I think because the examiner shared my passion for Neruda’s poetry. Lovely man. He had a really strong Liverpool accent, but he spoke Spanish beautifully (or at least so far as I could tell). Funny the things you remember.

              Liked by 1 person

Leave a reply - I'd love to hear from you.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.